Tag Archives: waka

WINTER SOLITUDE

A loose translation of yet another old Japanese winter waka: My dwelling; In the fallen snow The path is gone; Forging through to visit me Comes no one at all. The first part of the waka is: My dwelling; In … Continue reading

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SO COLD THE WINTER….

Here is a loose translation of another old Japanese waka for the season of winter: So cold the winter! The wind never ceases In the mountain village. Still the sleet is falling Ever more heavily. As previously mentioned, a waka … Continue reading

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REFLECTION

The old year has departed.  Here is a loose translation of a waka by Ki No Tsurayuki (c.  872-945).  You will recall that a waka, in form, is like a hokku — but with two extra lines added.  In Japanese … Continue reading

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HOKKU: CREATE THE RIGHT CONDITIONS

In the previous posting, I wrote that the poetic-aesthetic experience created in the mind on reading a hokku is involuntary; it just happens, because the hokku has created the right conditions for it to happen. To better understand this, let’s … Continue reading

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RAIN DRIPPING INTO A BASIN

I periodically emphasize that I do not translate old hokku here just to be translating them, but rather to show through them how hokku are to be written today in English and other languages. Some time ago I discussed this … Continue reading

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A WILLOWY WALDEN

Not long ago I introduced two short-verse “alternative” forms.  Both were intended for those times when a hokku is too small in space for what needs to be said. We find such an example in English translations of one of … Continue reading

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THE HOKKU, THE WALDEN, AND NOW THE LOREN

Kyorai, one of Bashō’s students, wrote: Hito aze wa    shibashi naki yamu    kawazu kana One path wa for-a-while  cries silent   frogs kana An aze is specifically a path through rice paddies. When Blyth translated this, he changed … Continue reading

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