Tag Archives: Chinese poetry

BRIEF INTERVAL

Another loose translation of a very old Chinese poem, this time by Chen Zi’ang (661-702) A Song on Climbing Youzhou Tower Unseen are those who came before; Unseen are those to come after. Thinking how endless are heaven and earth, … Continue reading

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ONLY WHITE CLOUDS….

Here is a loose translation of a poem by Wang Wei (王維; 699–759): Amid the hills are many Dharma friends; Meditating, chanting, gathering in groups; But look out from the far city wall, And only white clouds are seen. 山中多法侶 … Continue reading

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TAO YUAN-MING’S SPRING

R. H. Blyth called this work by Tao Qian (Tao Yuan-ming, c. 365-427) and translated by Arthur Waley “the best translation… of the best poem in the world.” Swiftly the years, beyond recall, Solemn the stillness of this fair morning. … Continue reading

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HOKKU ROOTS: BAI JUYI’S SIXTY-SIX

Today I will talk briefly about a poem by the Chinese writer Bai Juyi (772 -846, also written as Po Chu-yi). You may recall from previous discussions of Chinese poetry here that most Chinese poems  are written in couplets (pairs … Continue reading

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THE “ESSENTIAL WORDS” TECHNIQUE IN NIGHT MOORING AT MAPLE BRIDGE

My purpose is not to discuss Chinese poetry in any academic sense.  Instead, it is to show how certain characteristics of old Chinese Nature poetry may be used in writing English Nature poetry. The most significant of these tools is, … Continue reading

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MORE ON USING “CHINESE” TECHNIQUE IN ENGLISH POETRY

In looking over past statistics for this site, I noticed that one of the most frequented postings was on writing “Chinese poetry” in English.  Of course what is meant by that is poetry written in English, but using the form … Continue reading

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BEYOND THE HILLS: MORE PRACTICE IN CHINESE-STYLE VERSE

Here is some more on writing five-word Chinese-style quatrains.  For this exercise I have chosen a verse by Li Pin, called “Crossing the Han River.”  I have adjusted the five words of each line to fit English better, but the … Continue reading

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